Picture: Barry Winiker/Getty Pictures

Amidst the barrage of inquiries the New York Situations editorial board not long ago put to metropolis mayoral candidates was 1 from Mara Gay that elicited a amount of wild — and wildly improper — responses: What’s the median profits rate for a dwelling in Brooklyn? Ray McGuire, the former Citigroup government who life in the San Remo making on Central Park West (where presently readily available apartments begin at $4.2 million, and servicing expenses can run $10,000 a month) put the typical close to $80,000 to $90,000. Shaun Donovan, who ran President Obama’s Department of Housing and City Progress for 5 a long time just after operating as a housing official in New York Metropolis, guessed $100,000. (He later mentioned that he was referring to assessed values.) The median price presently sits at $900,000, and I regret to tell you that Andrew Yang was the only candidate who experienced the right response. Park Slope resident Kathryn Garcia, whom the Periods endorsed, was near at $800,000. At the other stop of the spectrum was Maya Wiley, who stated $1.8 million.

It’s tricky to fathom how any person could consider property price ranges are so reduced in Brooklyn — in no way mind two individuals who want to be mayor of a city with substantial housing concerns. But that aside, the discussion remaining us asking yourself this: What can you get in New York Metropolis for under $100,000? There are at present just 7 models on StreetEasy that fit the monthly bill, six in the Bronx and just one in Queens. (In Brooklyn, $100,000 will just scarcely purchase you a parking location.) And while, say, a vivid, pleasurable-seeking studio apartment in a co-op setting up in the Highbridge for just 5 figures surely sounds like a steal, most of New York City’s most inexpensive houses for sale have lingered on the market. For the reason that at this lowest stop of the value range, residences are inclined to have certain limitations on who can truly purchase.

Here’s a glance at a couple of of the quite number of residences readily available in the Donovan-McGuire selling price variety.

With parquet flooring and first moldings, the two studio models in this Summit Avenue co-op setting up search really attractive and are a limited wander from Yankee Stadium. But not only is this an revenue-limited building, both readily available units cannot be financed (month-to-month maintenance is about $500), meaning a consumer would have to both earn $95,520 or considerably less ($109,200 for a household of two) and have $60,000 or $70,000 in dollars to invest in a person of these units.

At 550 sq. feet, this studio is just $145 for every square foot — significantly, significantly more affordable than the citywide median of $763. It has exposed brick and a renovated bathroom with a barn-model sliding doorway. But it is also the two an cash flow-restricted and all-hard cash sale the device has been on the sector for 109 times, and the price was dropped by $10,000 nearly two months in the past.

This co-op unit in Queens is a rarity in this least expensive of selling price ranges: It is not profits-limited, and does not have to have an all-dollars sale. So what does $100,000 get you in North Corona? The listing only attributes photos of the building’s brick exterior, but other, pricier models in the co-op glance just good, if not a very little dim.

Although this is nevertheless a further revenue-limited sale in a Highbridge co-op, it’s the closest prospect to a common residence-sale condition of the four: Only 10 per cent down is expected, with “limited funding obtainable,” for each the listing. Upkeep is about $500, so depending on property finance loan conditions, this approximately all-white studio with substantial ceilings could price tag all over $1,000/month.

This is one more anomaly in the $100,000 cost vary in that it is a easy sale: There are no money constraints and the apartment can be financed. The deck off of the primary living house is admittedly a little bit slim, but there is a view of the nearby reservoir in Jerome Park.

This 550-square-foot a person-bedroom seems to do a ton with very tiny room and consists of a kitchen that’s massive adequate for a little dining-home table. But like other Bronx co-ops in the five-figures, not just any one can invest in it: The device is profits-restricted, and features have to be all-dollars.